Evening at the Embassy of Myanmar

child.Thursday, May 18 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
2300 S St NW, Washington, DC 20008

Featuring:

  • Silent Auction (see below for a list of the items)
  • Heavy hors d’oeuvres & beverages
  • and more!

Program

Ambassador Aung Lynn
Kaythi Win Aung, GCSF Myanmar
Sylvia Fraser-Lu, My First Library

Tickets

$75 per person
Contact Winnie Merritt at winnie@globalcommunityservice.org or 703-890-0599

RSVP by May 10, 2017. Space is limited!

Dress Code

Smart casual

Street parking is available

If you cannot attend and wish to make a donation, please go here.

Silent Auction Items

Chesapeake Bay Bridge.Sailing in Chesapeake Bay
Spend the day sailing on the Chesapeake Bay with Ray Turner and his wife! Space for 2, includes sailing across the Bay and enjoying lunch at Kentmorr Marina and restaurant. Available before July or after mid-August. Allowance of $100 ($50 per person) for lunch.
Library of Congress.Private Guided Tour of the Library of Congress
You and your private group (up to 12) will be escorted through one of the most beautiful buildings in the world, the Library of Congress Jefferson Building, by docent Bill Goldman. Bill’s tour will include historical information as well as information about the current operation of the Library of Congress. Bill also will include some exhibits (Thomas Jefferson’s library and the 1507 Waldseemuller map, the first map to use the word America) that the public tours normally do not include! Tour can take at a mutually agreed upon time.
Gold Lacquer Offering Bowl
Handmade Burmese Puppet
Burmese Wall Hanging
This quilt was started in a class with Jean Wells focused on interpreting photographs into design elements in an art quilt. The images I started with were from a trip my husband and I took to Inle Lake in 2010. We were both mesmerized by the beauty of the people and the area. The quilt project hibernated for a few years but then took shape in 2013. The colors of the sky and stupas at Shwe Indien Pagoda are represented in the nine patch “log cabin” blocks in the upper left of the piece. The small pieced shibori strip on the right of this represents the sunsets we saw nightly from our hotel. The middle strip is the lake and the lower piece are the floating gardens and markets. The background fabric represents the color of the soil throughout the region and was woven in Bali. The quilt was machine pieced and quilted with a combination of commercial and hand dyed batiks and cotton fabrics. 17 inches wide and 24 inches long. Hanging rod was hand made in Western North Carolina.
Lacquer Lunch Box
Burmese Tattoo Kit
Old carved Burmese tattoo kit with bronze needles
Mon-style Crowned Buddha Image Late 19th century. Wood, lacquer and gold leaf
This provincial example of a wooden gilded seated Buddha image from southern Myanmar, mounted on a throne, is notable for its solid squat appearance and short neck. The slab-like feet are in the interlocking lotus position (padmasana) and the right hand in the earth-touching position (bhumisparsa) signifying the moment of enlightenment, the most prevalent pose for an image of the Blessed One in Myanmar. This bejeweled Buddha with its soaring tiered sawtooth crown is known as a Jambupati image after a legend popular in Southeast Asia. The story tells of Jambupati an arrogant ambitious monarch who intimidated rulers of neighboring states by acting in a belligerent manner until he was humbled and converted by the Buddha who appeared before him resplendently attired and bejeweled as a powerful universal monarch and world conqueror (cakkavatti).
Religious Manuscript Early 20th century. Teak, cotton cloth, lacquer, gold leaf
Such manuscripts were commissioned as an acts of merit to present to highly revered monks often at at the time when a son became novice. Many contain dedicatory inscriptions complete with the date of presentation and the donors names along with an earnest desire to eventually enter the blissful state of nirvana. Most manuscripts consist of around 16 consecutive unbound pages inscribed with an extract from one of the nine khandakhas, a section of the Vinaya (rules for monks) in the Pali language that prescribes the conduct of ceremonies pertaining to monks such as ordination, the presentation of robes, the designation of sacred ground etc. Made from layers of lacquered cloth, the pages are read from left to right and are inscribed with up to six lines of text written in thick lustrous lacquer in a square “tamarind seed” script popular around the time of the Pagan dynasty (1044-1287). The intervening spaces and margins are ornamented with delicate wisps of foliage and birds in gold leaf against a fine hatch-stroke ground. The pages are enclosed by a pair of teak covers embellished with a horizontal frieze of interlocking space cells enclosing lively effigies of devas alternating with fanciful animals. The end papers are similarly decorated. A small hole to the left of each page allows for a bamboo pin to be drawn through to secure the text when not in use. The gold leaf is extremely delicate and easily rubs off after much handling. Such texts were highly revered and carefully wrapped away in cloth covers (sapa-lwe) and bound with specially woven braids (sa-zigyo) before being stored in highly ornamented teak chests known as sadaik.
Burmese Lacquer Clock with Stand Early 20th century. Teak, cotton cloth, lacquer, gold leaf
Such manuscripts were commissioned as an acts of merit to present to highly revered monks often at at the time when a son became novice. Many contain dedicatory inscriptions complete with the date of presentation and the donors names along with an earnest desire to eventually enter the blissful state of nirvana. Most manuscripts consist of around 16 consecutive unbound pages inscribed with an extract from one of the nine khandakhas, a section of the Vinaya (rules for monks) in the Pali language that prescribes the conduct of ceremonies pertaining to monks such as ordination, the presentation of robes, the designation of sacred ground etc. Made from layers of lacquered cloth, the pages are read from left to right and are inscribed with up to six lines of text written in thick lustrous lacquer in a square “tamarind seed” script popular around the time of the Pagan dynasty (1044-1287). The intervening spaces and margins are ornamented with delicate wisps of foliage and birds in gold leaf against a fine hatch-stroke ground. The pages are enclosed by a pair of teak covers embellished with a horizontal frieze of interlocking space cells enclosing lively effigies of devas alternating with fanciful animals. The end papers are similarly decorated. A small hole to the left of each page allows for a bamboo pin to be drawn through to secure the text when not in use. The gold leaf is extremely delicate and easily rubs off after much handling. Such texts were highly revered and carefully wrapped away in cloth covers (sapa-lwe) and bound with specially woven braids (sa-zigyo) before being stored in highly ornamented teak chests known as sadaik.
Mandalay Restaurant.Dinner at the Mandalay Restaurant
In Silver Spring
Sheep.Dr. Schar’s Eco Farm
McLean Racquet Club
One month’s free family membership in a tennis and swimming club, including childcare
Lily pond.Lily Ponds Water Lily
Discount coupon for a container to plant it in
Dr. Schar’s Eco Farm Tour
Ethnic Woman Headwear
House and Closet Organization
Dandy cruise.Dinner cruise on the Dandy
Moggallana, Disciple of the Buddha. Early 20th century. Bronze
During the Konbaung period (1752-1885) in Myanmar it became popular to show the Buddha in temple and monastic shrines flanked by seated sculptures of his two chief disciples—Sariputta on his right and Moggallana on his left. Born of Brahmin parents in adjacent villages north of Rajagaha in present day Bihar, the pair grew up together and were ascetics prior to becoming followers of the Buddha. Through their piety and superior intellect they became arhats (enlightened beings) Sariputta became second to the Buddha in wisdom and knowledge of the dharma (Buddhist scripture), while Moggallana was noted for his paranormal, parapsychological, telepathic, astral travel and telekinesis abilities. He was killed by bandits at the instigation of a rival sect. Moggallana clad in monk’s robes, is usually depicted kneeling with hands in the praying position (namaskara mudra). In Mahayana Buddhism Moggallana is also honored for filial piety towards his parents.